About your council tax

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We only keep 10% of the council tax you pay. That’s about £185 a year for an average local home. We pass the rest to Staffordshire County Council, the Staffordshire Commissioner - Police & Crime, Staffordshire Commissioner - Fire & Rescue and local parish councils (as shown below).

Chart showing proportion of council tax allocated to different Staffordshire authorities

Lichfield District Council’s element of your council tax is used to fund the following key priorities. The figures in brackets represent income.


What we will spend this year 2021/22

The element funded by Council Tax

What this costs an average Band D home

Enabling People

Sports and Leisure

£327,140

£197,034

£5.07

Community

£393,000

£236,701

£6.09

Environmental health

£1,169,070

£704,122

£18.10

Homelessness

£478,060

£287,932

£7.40

Shaping Place

Waste Collection from homes

£1,938,150

£1,167,334

£30.01

Parks and Open Spaces

£1,214,250

£731,334

£18.80

Street Cleansing and Public toilets

£723,160

£435,554

£11.20

Planning Policy, conservation and countryside protection

£618,160

£372,313

£9.57

Administration of housing benefit

£357,920

£215,573

£5.54

Housing Strategy and the Enabling Role

£169,650

£102,179

£2.63

Developing Prosperity

Planning applications, Car Parks and Economic Growth

£273,500

£164,727

£4.24

The Arts including the Lichfield Garrick

£305,120

£183,772

£4.73

Waste collection from businesses

(£95,790)

(£57,694)

(£1.48)

Council owned property

(£265,500)

(£159,909)

(£4.11)

A Good Council

Council Tax and Business Rates Collection

£650,460

£391,767

£10.07

Electoral Registration, Elections and Councillors

£890,770

£536,504

£13.79

Central costs not allocated to individual services

£1,437,500

£865,796

£22.26

COVID-19 recovery

£1,137,380

£685,036

£17.61

Capital, Interest and reserves

£229,000

£137,925

£3.55

Total

£11,951,000

£7,198,000

£185.07

Please note the table above allocates the ongoing impact of COVID-19 and the majority of central costs to activities within each key priority to show the full cost of delivering the service in 2022/23.

We are among the lowest charging district/borough councils in the country, so the services we provide are good value, when compared to many district/borough councils nationwide. An average home in our district pays £185 a year our services, whereas the district/borough council with the highest charge collects £377 a year for similar services. The table below compares Council Tax charged by district/borough councils nationwide.

Chart showing comparison of Lichfield council tax with highest and lowest charges in England

To meet our funding gap next year, we will consider increasing the amount of council tax we charge for our element of your bill. The government allows this council to increase its share of the Council Tax. In 2021/22, the maximum increase for an average home was £5 a year or 2% - whichever is the larger amount. A £5 increase is projected to provide an additional £199,000 of income which is near to the cost of running sports and leisure for example.

We only keep 10% of the council tax you pay. That’s about £185 a year for an average local home. We pass the rest to Staffordshire County Council, the Staffordshire Commissioner - Police & Crime, Staffordshire Commissioner - Fire & Rescue and local parish councils (as shown below).

Chart showing proportion of council tax allocated to different Staffordshire authorities

Lichfield District Council’s element of your council tax is used to fund the following key priorities. The figures in brackets represent income.


What we will spend this year 2021/22

The element funded by Council Tax

What this costs an average Band D home

Enabling People

Sports and Leisure

£327,140

£197,034

£5.07

Community

£393,000

£236,701

£6.09

Environmental health

£1,169,070

£704,122

£18.10

Homelessness

£478,060

£287,932

£7.40

Shaping Place

Waste Collection from homes

£1,938,150

£1,167,334

£30.01

Parks and Open Spaces

£1,214,250

£731,334

£18.80

Street Cleansing and Public toilets

£723,160

£435,554

£11.20

Planning Policy, conservation and countryside protection

£618,160

£372,313

£9.57

Administration of housing benefit

£357,920

£215,573

£5.54

Housing Strategy and the Enabling Role

£169,650

£102,179

£2.63

Developing Prosperity

Planning applications, Car Parks and Economic Growth

£273,500

£164,727

£4.24

The Arts including the Lichfield Garrick

£305,120

£183,772

£4.73

Waste collection from businesses

(£95,790)

(£57,694)

(£1.48)

Council owned property

(£265,500)

(£159,909)

(£4.11)

A Good Council

Council Tax and Business Rates Collection

£650,460

£391,767

£10.07

Electoral Registration, Elections and Councillors

£890,770

£536,504

£13.79

Central costs not allocated to individual services

£1,437,500

£865,796

£22.26

COVID-19 recovery

£1,137,380

£685,036

£17.61

Capital, Interest and reserves

£229,000

£137,925

£3.55

Total

£11,951,000

£7,198,000

£185.07

Please note the table above allocates the ongoing impact of COVID-19 and the majority of central costs to activities within each key priority to show the full cost of delivering the service in 2022/23.

We are among the lowest charging district/borough councils in the country, so the services we provide are good value, when compared to many district/borough councils nationwide. An average home in our district pays £185 a year our services, whereas the district/borough council with the highest charge collects £377 a year for similar services. The table below compares Council Tax charged by district/borough councils nationwide.

Chart showing comparison of Lichfield council tax with highest and lowest charges in England

To meet our funding gap next year, we will consider increasing the amount of council tax we charge for our element of your bill. The government allows this council to increase its share of the Council Tax. In 2021/22, the maximum increase for an average home was £5 a year or 2% - whichever is the larger amount. A £5 increase is projected to provide an additional £199,000 of income which is near to the cost of running sports and leisure for example.

Page last updated: 01 October 2021, 16:14